Things I Found Out Being a First Time Mom

By Debbie
December 16, 2014 on 4:28 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Hayley Benson. Think you have to give up your triathlon lifestyle because you are starting a family? Think again! Follow Hayley’s blog.

Pregnancy:

No matter what kind of shape you are in, or what kind of athlete you are, or how strong willed you, are your body and pregnancy will have its own ideas.  I was quite convinced that I would run throughout my pregnancy. We lived so close to the hospital that I was even convinced that I would jog the 1.5 miles to the delivery room when labor arrived.  How naïve was I!  I am one of those annoying people who actually likes running and could run a sub-6 minute mile even after months of not running, so I thought for sure I would be running through my pregnancy.  This just wasn’t the case. I managed a little bit in the early stages, but due to the Arizona heat, the bowling ball in my stomach and the nausea, I just couldn’t do it at all after 28 weeks.

Doing flip turns in the pool during pregnancy will not harm your baby.

No amount of activity, swimming, hiking, running, whatever you are able to do during pregnancy, will induce labor. When it’s time, it’s time, there’s no changing it. I was taking long hikes, swimming 1000s of yards and my baby was still late.

Pregnant and active!

After delivery:

I’m sorry to say, but you will pee yourself while running the first few times after delivery. Things are a little stretched out and traumatized down there, but this is a TRANSIENT thing and it does go away.

You will get your fitness back far quicker than you ever expected. You will not believe this, but I’m writing it anyway because it is true.  I understand why you don’t believe it, you are bloated, beyond tired, still on the heavy side even after dumping out the actual baby, but you do get your fitness back fast. The body is remarkable at recovery.

Getting out with baby...the new training methods!

The first few months of babyhood:

Every new Mom athlete needs to have an espresso machine and a treadmill.  You will be sleeping A LOT less and you will need caffeine.  You will need to take advantage of when baby sleeps to get some training done, so buy a decent treadmill…you are going to use it a lot. You don’t have to get a new one, there are some great deals on Craigslist.

Get back on the bandwagon with racing, that first race is always going to be nerve-wracking, but when it comes down to it, it’s an accomplishment in itself just to be on the starting line when you are trying to care for a young baby.  I can attest that even if you can’t breast feed your baby right before the start of a 10km race, your baby will not starve during the time it takes you to complete the race, no matter how slow you are.  I remember being quite convinced that my baby would starve while I did my first 10km post delivery. Hey, I was sleep deprived and rational thought was non-existent.  Triathlons generally take longer than running races, so I would advise either breast feeding or pumping before the race, especially if your Tri top is very tight fitting because you will not be able to get it on without pumping first!

Still getting medals post-pregnancy!

You will have to train tired…if you waited to train until you weren’t tired you would never get any training done.  You can tolerate more sleep deprivation than you think you can, and don’t listen to the “babies sleep through the night at x weeks/months old, at x weight, at x developmental stage,” your baby will sleep through the night whenever he or she feels like it. In my case I had to wait 9 months!

The times when you could ride your bike from sunrise to sunset, when you could just take off on an adventure trail run and come back when you feel like it are gone, you have to think about who is going to watch the baby.  If you are lucky enough to get out for an epic training session, it can’t be too epic as you have to be able to function when you get home. There are no days off from motherhood (yes, you will have a bit of nostalgia for those old times…it’s OK to feel like that).

Hire a coach if at all possible. If you are like most mere mortals, you are also working a steady job, as well as being an athlete and a parent, and you don’t have the time to put in crazy amounts of hours training. A coach will help streamline what you do.  I am actually faster post-baby and with less hours training all thanks to a good coach.

Being an athlete and a Mom isn’t easy, but then again, if it were easy it wouldn’t be worth doing. My daughter, Sierra, is worth the challenges I have had to overcome with my athletics and she enriches my life.  I’m looking forward to teaching her to swim, bike and run, just like mom!

Fast mama

Triathlon Recovery 101

By Debbie
November 25, 2014 on 1:23 pm | In Nutrition Tips, Product Information, Random Musings, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Ali Rutledge. During this week of giving thanks, you should also thank your body by giving it the tools to recover better! Follow Ali on Twitter – alaida.

When it comes to triathlon success, recovery is a key component. Here are a few things to help you recover to your best.

  1. Compression - Use after a hard workout to speed up the recovery process. This will promote blood flow and remove toxins from your aching muscles. You can use a variety of socks, calf sleeves (active recovery only – do NOT use if you are just lounging around), tights or recovery pump boots, just to name a few.

    Zensah Argyle Compression Socks

  2. Ice - Used since the beginning of triathlon time, cold water is cheap and reduces soreness. A bath tub, lake or any body of water 55 degrees for 15 minutes will do. Your best result will be after your hard workout. If you have problems tolerating the cold, sipping warm fluids can help.

    Ice can really suck in the short run, but the benefits are awesome!

  3. Massage - You can use your own licensed massage therapist or your own tools for self massage. Today there are many massage tools on the market. Just a few to name are a foam roller, the Stick, or Trigger Point Therapy products. Massage promotes healing by removing old blood with toxins and getting fresh blood flow to the injured areas to promote recovery.

    Work the junk out of those muscles!

  4. Active Recovery - This will promote blood flow and homeostasis if done correctly. An easy spin, low-intensity run or an easy swim can promote recovery to injured tissues. You must leave your ego at home for this one!
  5. Rest - Recovery days, good sleep and a mental boost are imperative for improving athletic performance. We all need physical and mental relief from the stress of training. Doing something different or just a sleep-in day is a good example. You will feel fresh and ready to go the next day.
  6. Nutrition – Within 30 minutes after a hard training session, recovery nutrition is important to repair muscles and rebuild glycogen stores. There are many bars, shakes or just real food from which to chose. Blender bottles work great to mix any drinks. Eat like a champion!!

    Be smart with your nutrition

A training plan is not complete without a good recovery plan.  Being smart about your recovery will be the key to making a happy and healthy triathlete.  Cheers to swim, bike, run and recovery!

Addicted? No…OK, Well, Maybe…Yes, Yes, I Am

By Debbie
November 18, 2014 on 3:04 pm | In Community, Random Musings | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Tom Golden and Team athlete Leo Carrillo. They are partners in triathlon and, apparently, enable each other. Hey guys, we can probably find you some help! (Editor’s note – In no way is this blog post meant to bring lightness to the serious problems of addiction…it is meant only to make fun of ourselves).

[Scene]  I’m on a Hawaiian Airlines flight to Kona for a vacation with my family. I’m feeling super pumped to be going to the home of triathlon’s biggest event. In the plane, I am waiting in that peculiar line for the bathroom and some guy says to me, “You do triathlons?” I’m thinking, “Why would he ask that? Is it my shaved legs, my year round tan, my Zoot shoes or possibly my fit triathlete looking physique?” “I do,” I replied, beaming with pride, “how did you know?” “Your Oceanside 70.3 shirt,” he says. “Ohhhh, right my shirt,” I reply. “You do triathlons?” I ask. “I did, most addicting sport ever,” he says. How great is this, a fellow triathlete to chat with on my way to Kona, this is great! He then goes on to say, “My wife divorced me and my kids hate me because of triathlon and it nearly ruined my life. It’s a selfish sport,” he says. I was speechless. You would have thought I was talking to a recovering addict. The nerve of this guy! Well, for the next few hours, I started to think about what he said. Addicting, could one be addicted to triathlon? Maybe? So I started thinking what the similarities between a Triathlete guy and an Addict guy might be, just to check his theory. My training partner, Leo, and I came up with the following:

  1. Addict guy usually has a partner that he uses with; Triathlete guy has a training partner.
  2. The lean physique of Addict guy and race ready Triathlete guy could be confused for one another.
  3. Addict guy gets cranky and agitated when he can’t get his fix, whatever that may be; Triathlete guy also gets cranky and agitated when he can’t train.
  4. Addict guy has a dealer or supplier; Triathlon guy has TriSports, run by the one they call Seton.
  5. Willingness to spend top dollar on the best stuff, interchangeable.
  6. “I can do more, I can handle it.”  Interchangeable.
  7. Despite the amount of pain and suffering, you continue to do it anyway, interchangeable again.
  8. Addict guy craving a six and a half hour high sounds like awesome, normal fun (for him). Triathlon guy craving a six and half hour workout also sounds like awesome, normal fun.
  9. Addict guy pushing the limits, teetering on the edge; much like Triathlon guy pushing the limits on a long training session, risking injury. Both would say totally worth the gains.
  10. Addict guy swearing he’ll give up his addiction after being caught/busted/found out, even as he’s planning how to do it again.  Triathlete guy 20 miles into the run during an iron distance race swears never again and tells himself this was a stupid idea, yet he finds himself standing in a long line with stiff, sore legs the next day, credit card tightly in hand, ready to sign up again.

Well, there you have it. I may have been stretching on a few of those, but let’s face it…this is an addicting sport. I admit it has a grip on me and my fellow triathletes. Just call me Triathlon addict guy, I’m OK with that, I guess. Maybe the airplane guy had a point, but for me, it’s a good addiction. Triathlon has taken me to some really cool places to race. It’s transformed my health and physical condition. I’ve learned to push myself and juggle a loaded work/family/training schedule. Most importantly, I’ve met some really unique and great people over the years. After being a triathlete, anything in life will be a piece of cake. Yup, I’m OK with the thought of being a Triathlon addict! OK, gotta go…need to get to TriSports now!

Tom & Leo share the podium

Free Speed

By Zachary
November 11, 2014 on 2:51 pm | In Uncategorized | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports member Thomas Gerlach. He is in his third full year as a professional triathlete and recently took 2nd at Ironman Louisville, along with numerous podiums in 2013 including 2nd at Ironman Louisville and 7th at both Ironman Los Cabos and Coeur d’Alene. He has the 3rd fastest Ironman bike split by an American at 4:15:57. He writes a weekly training update every week at www.thomasgerlach.com where he publishes his weekly training numbers. Follow him at facebook.com/thomasgerlach and twitter.com/thomasgerlach

Race Wheels? How About Cleaning and Optimizing Your Drivetrain?

Why is it that people train on training wheels and with a road helmet, but then swap them out on race day for race wheels and an aero helmet?  I would argue that most people do it because they want to go faster on race day by improving aerodynamics. So why do people race on a drivetrain that is dirty and non-optimized? The reason I believe this to be the case is because people don’t understand how much time they are giving up in a dirty drivetrain, and particularly one that is not engineered for speed. If you are a serious racer looking to go as fast possible, then you need to look at places your competition isn’t. Looking around at the rest of the Pro bikes in transition I can tell you one place my competition is losing “Free Speed” is in their drivetrains.

Keep you drivetrain clean for free speed

Keep you drivetrain clean for free speed

According to Friction Facts – a totally independent testing company – those racing a dirty drivetrain could be losing as much as 7 watts in a dirty chain. A chain that was clean but had the lubed stripped off was as much as 20 watts. In both cases the load on the chain tested was 250 watts – a very realistic output of a rider unlike the unrealistic number of 30mph used in wind tunnel tests. But the savings don’t stop there. Just like race wheels are tuned to be as aerodynamic as possible over training wheels, there are drivetrains that have been engineered to reduce the energy that is normally lost in mechanical inefficiencies. One company that is engineering drivetrains to be as efficient as possible is a company called Atomic.

Aftermarket chainring coatings

Atomic specializes in making drivetrains as fast as possible but they don’t actually manufacturer drivetrain parts. Instead Atomic has a special coating that is impregnated on to your current chainrings, cassettes and metal derailleur pulleys. This coating reduces the friction between their specially lubed chain and those parts and results in an energy savings. In this case the savings is through improved mechanical efficiency and not aerodynamics. The benefits, however, are still the same…you either go the same speed on less watts, or you go faster on the same watts. Using Atomic coated chainrings, cassette, and chain, the rider can save an additional 43 seconds over an Olympic distance triathlon, 1 minute and 37 seconds over a half-Ironman, and 3 minutes and 14 seconds over a full Ironman.

Next time you set out to race, make sure you have a clean drive train. You can clean a drive train in 10 seconds by using some White Lightning Clean Streak Degreaser and then properly lube the chain afterwards. If you want to go as fast as possible, though, you can send your current parts in for coating to Atomic or you can always purchase a new set of chainrings and a cassette from TriSports.com and send them in for coating, as well. Either way, when you combine it with race wheels and an aero helmet, you will know you will be going as fast as possible.

Becoming Friends with the Bike

By Debbie
November 4, 2014 on 11:42 am | In Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports member Pam Winders. She’s living proof that you simply can’t fake the bike. Follow Pam on Twitter – pamye6.

It’s interesting how things always come full circle. This past summer I have had friends come up to me after races, devastated with their bike performance. They proceed to pick my brain as to why I believe their bike didn’t go as planned and what training they could have done prior to the race in order to succeed and see where they went wrong. It amazed me how many of those people had only gone on a ride or two prior to the race. So with that, I basically told them what they didn’t want to hear, which was the obvious; if you want to do well and meet your goals, then you have to do the work and actually train for your desired results.

When I first started triathlon four years ago I was always amazed with the bike portion of the race…there are some really fast riders out there! I wanted to be the fastest, so my first goal in triathlon was to “master,” or at least get better on, the bike. I quickly learned two things; 1) Bikes are REALLY expensive and 2) There are no shortcuts to success – aka: you have to do the work in order to see the results you’re seeking.

With my overachieving goal of always being on the podium, I went out and bought Betty, an awesome women’s specific Felt DA, and a bike trainer. When I started triathlon I was living in Alaska, so getting out on the road and accumulating what I call “real life” miles was nonexistent; therefore the trainer was a necessity. In addition, I purchased my first pair of heavy duty diaper biking shorts. I wasn’t winning any fashion awards in them, and I definitely wasn’t picking up any hot guys, but I knew that in order for me to put the time in the saddle, comfort was vital.

Hardcore cycling in Alaska

From that point on I spent many days, especially Sundays, in my living room watching NFL while riding Betty instead of snuggled up on the couch. As I began to educate myself more on biking, I learned to incorporate more specific workouts for racing and that’s when the real fun began. I would include hill repeats, speed and distance intervals and soon enough I was seeing dramatic changes in my riding; I could ride longer and was stronger and faster!!

My real love for biking didn’t come until after that initially painful boring living room period from which I went out and did my first “real life” ride of the season racing St. George 70.3. Not the smartest move on my part after training in dark, cold Alaska on a trainer and a treadmill all winter, but all the hard work and time I put in by becoming friends with my bike made it so worth it and I was actually able to enjoy the ride instead of suffer through it.

After St. George I’ve continued to embrace my bike; I’ve put on a power meter, which I’d highly recommend to anyone wanting to race competitively or who has a thing for numbers. By incorporating power into my riding, it has taken my training to a whole different excruciating level of pain and sweat, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

A strong bike = good chances for a podium position!

In the end, the only way to get better and have fun while riding is to put in the time and become friends with your bike!!

After the Finish Line

By Debbie
October 28, 2014 on 9:30 am | In Athlete Profile, Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Martin Soole. We all know what we do leading up to a race…train, train, train! But what about after? Check out Martin’s blog or follow him on Twitter – martin.soole.

There are many points in life when one must reevaluate and refocus.  I’ve recently found myself at one of those points. I spent all of last year training and racing toward an Ironman finish. It was a rather simple, lovely existence.  I woke up every morning and knew I had to train.  I put in hours and hours of work.  I bought the best gear available from TriSports.com, I learned from the best; I was the best physical version of myself capable of the world’s most challenging one day endurance race.

Before Ironman Lake Tahoe 2013

If you followed my blogs last year, you know that my Ironman debut in Lake Tahoe in 2013 did not go as planned. Read that article here.

The hundreds of training hours couldn’t prepare me for a bike mechanical failure that ended my day prematurely.  I mourned that defeat for a long time. I had so many questions.  I drove myself crazy trying to make sense of it all and come to terms with an event that was ultimately out of my hands. I had done everything in my power to be prepared for that race.  I even trained with my coach on the course the previous month. But the Universe had other plans.  It turns out that I gained more from that defeat than I would have if I had finished.

When I was training on a daily basis I didn’t make room in my life for anything else.  I felt like a monk at times.  I stopped socializing with friends, I only ate a strict diet, I let my business dealings lag, and fell out of touch with the artistic reasons for my move to LA in the first place.  Many athletes can find balance during their Ironman journey.  I was obsessed and I could not.

I moved to LA to work in film and TV. Here I am (far right) on the Showtime show “Shameless”.

It turns out that I needed a big let down to allow me the breathing room to refocus my energy and begin anew. If I had finished the race, I would have probably gone right into the next and the next and the next and been swept up in the sport and only the sport. There is certainly nothing wrong with this, but I would not have been able to walk down that path in a healthy way. I could have further alienated my friends and family and lost sight of my career goals. I can’t stress enough how obsessed and out of balance I was. But there were lessons to be learned here if I was willing to take note.

All that time spent training and racing was not lost. Ultimately, I learned what I was capable of, I found my limits, and learned how to push past them. This could not have been learned in any other way. Triathlon has many transferable life skills. Self reliance, resilience in the face of challenges, and mental toughness are just a few that come to mind. These skills have come into play in my professional life, as I am now producing a feature film called “#Speedball.”  It’s an action sports drama, think; “Fast and the Furious” meets the sport of paintball. If you think triathlon is hard, try producing a multi-million dollar movie franchise.

Despite the Heartbreak at Ironman Lake Tahoe, I knew I needed some redemption and wanted to release the pain of that event from my life.  I fulfilled that at Ironman California 70.3.  It wasn’t the full Ironman finish I had striven for, but this victory was in some ways better. I looked back at the previous year and decided to do things differently as I prepared this time. While training, I started dating a wonderful girl, I kept my relationships strong, and moved forward with all areas of my life. I was able to balance my entertainment career, my personal life, and my training.  I had learned the lesson I was meant to and found closure with the event in Lake Tahoe.

A victory kiss from my girlfriend

I still swim, bike, and run. I moved to the beach with that wonderful girl I started dating and I’ve picked up surfing. My life is more full and vibrant than it has ever been.  From my greatest disappointment came the opportunity to live the balanced life I was meant to live.

Surfing Soole

So, in the midst of heartbreak and setbacks, take a moment to stop and reevaluate. One area of your life may be out of balance.  That situation is there for a very specific purpose.  Once you’re able to release the hurt, look for the gift in the ashes. There is a lesson to be learned. Don’t mourn the failure; it might be just what you needed. Most of all, don’t forget to keep moving forward.

The Off-Season

By Debbie
October 21, 2014 on 1:51 pm | In Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports athlete Liz Miller. The off-season is coming, so what are you going to do about it? Check out Liz’s blog or follow her on Twitter – FeWmnLiz (can you tell she’s a geologist?).

Some people dread the off-season, and other people love it. I usually feel a little bit of both excitement and anxiety when it’s time to transition to the off-season. Excitement because the off-season typically means sleeping in, weekends away without my swim, bike, and run gear, and maybe more than just an occasional glass of wine. Dread because the off-season also means shorter days, potential lack of motivation, and the occasional unwanted weight gain (especially around the holidays!).

In preparation for my off-season, I started looking around for some fun activities that didn’t necessarily involve swimming, biking, or running, or least not all 3 activities in the same race! Here are a few ideas for those of you who are getting ready to start your off-season, or maybe just looking for a few ideas to refresh your off-season routine.

Find a new type of race

I recently participated in my very first ultra-marathon. I have always been intrigued by ultra-marathons, but I typically need to save my quads and knees for quality long runs during Ironman training. This means that running 50K on trails is out of the question! But once your triathlon season is done, an ultra-marathon is a great way to put your fitness into something new and different.

I had a blast in my first ultra-marathon, not to mention the fact that since I wasn’t running with the goal of winning, I had more than enough time to stop and take pictures! Who can complain about running 50K when you have beautiful scenery like this?

The view during the Mt. Taylor 50K on 9/27/2014 (mttaylor50k.com)

Also, if you live somewhere with snow, look for some winter racing options. Snowshoe and cross country ski races are a great way to have some fun and challenge yourself without the pressure or stress that can sometimes be involved with a triathlon.

The ski to snowshoe transition during the Mt. Taylor Quad a few years ago (mttaylorquad.org)

Lastly, the winter can be a great time to try a swim meet or two! I participated in my first swim meet two years ago, and while I got DQ’ed from one event and certainly didn’t win any of the other events that I entered, I had a good time and enjoyed the challenge. Check out the U.S. Masters website for a list of local Masters groups that might be sponsoring an upcoming meet.

Try something new (or go back to something old!)

A few years ago, I took an “Introduction to Kettlebells” class that was required before participating in the local YMCA’s kettlebell course. I was hooked! It was a great mix of strength training and cardio work, and the 6 AM class was a great way to kick off the workday. The off-season is the perfect time to work on strength training (which is often overlooked during triathlon training), and kettlebells is a great way to do that.

Other strength training classes include TRX, Cross Fit, and other local YMCA or gym classes. I have found that TRX is another butt-kicker of a workout, relying mostly on body weight rather than weights, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that it’s easy!

Yoga and Pilates are additional options for new and different workouts that offer a nice variety to your typical swim, bike, and run schedule. Power and Bikram yoga can both be very challenging if you feel that you need a harder workout, and Pilates can really help with core strength, which can translate into better cycling form and faster running.

Most importantly, enjoy yourself!

The off-season shouldn’t be about constantly watching your food intake, weeks of difficult workouts, and a lack of social life. The off-season should be about kicking back, enjoying a treat now and then, and maybe sitting on the couch to watch a little more football than what is reasonable. Even more importantly, the off-season is about giving your mind and body a break from the rigors of triathlon training, to have some fun and not be too worried about missing a workout here and there.

Kicking back during a week-long canoe trip on Lake Mead during my winter off-season, 2012

The off-season also gives all of us triathletes time to step back, reflect on our performances over the season, and set new goals for the next year. And it’s important to remember that while we might lose a bit of fitness during the off-season, we’ll quickly gain it back at the start of the season, along with a renewed excitement for the sport and exciting goals to keep us motivated for the season.

Getting Faster in the Water

By Debbie
October 13, 2014 on 10:00 am | In Product Information, Training, Water | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Tom Golden. He’ll blow most peoples’ doors off in the water, so read on and get fast.

Much like a drug addict wanting a greater high, every year we, as triathletes, evaluate how to get to get more out of our addiction and take it to the next level.  For me, I think about that every year when it comes to running, which is my need-to-improve sport.  Fortunately, I grew up as a distance swimmer and consider it the lethal part of my race. More often than not, I hear from fellow triathletes, “I wish I had your swim” and “I just can’t seem to get faster.”  When I ask what they are doing in the water, I usually hear the same thing and think to myself, “no wonder your swim has not improved, you’re not really pushing your swim.”  I am by no means an expert but I have a very simple way to improve over the course of a season.  In fact, if you have 3 months left this year you still have time.

First, get in a masters swim program. [Editor's note: Many triathletes are intimidated by the thought of joining a Masters swim group, mostly because of the name...don't be. There are lanes for the very fast, but also the very slow, and they welcome everyone!] There are several really reasons for this. I know it costs money, but if you get in a good program, it’s worth every penny.  I used to swim on my own and it did the trick, but getting in the water and being pushed to race others in practice is a sure fire way to improve. It builds consistency at each workout.   You also gain the confidence of swimming tactfully.  You gain insight on how to wear someone out by changing your pace, or pacing with someone and then trying to drop them as they tire out.  You also gain knowledge from other, more experienced swimmers around you.  Having a coach from the deck to correct your stroke is essential, as well. Get the right equipment – kickboard, fins, paddles, buoy, your favorite goggles, and sometimes even a snorkel, and you’ll be ready to go.

A coach on deck can really help you improve your stroke

Second, it’s important to know that most masters programs are not designed for triathletes or distance swimming of 1.2 or 2.4 miles.  Most programs are tailored to a mid-distance sprint of a 200 or 500 yard race.  As a distance swimmer, you may think you need to be doing long sets of 800 repeats, and sometimes that’s good, but more importantly you need to learn how to pace and hold that pace. In a masters program, you will need to modify what you are doing so that you can work on pacing.  For instance, let’s say the set calls for 8×200 descend 1-4, 5-8.  You would adapt that set to holding a solid steady pace on each repeat and then get after the last one. Or going out moderate on the first 100 and negative split by 2 seconds on the second 100.  This will teach your body how to hold a pace, which is what you want to do in a race.  Be sure to be aware of others around you who are doing the set the way the coach called for and make sure that you don’t get in their way.

Use other swimmers to learn how to pace

Third, you need to adapt over time working in a tighter interval.  For example, each season, after all the fitness is gone and I get back in the water after a month break, I will start out in the 1:15 per 100 threshold lane. I focus on that concept of holding a pace no matter what the set calls for.  After about a week, I move to the 1:10 per 100 lane, again working on holding a pace. I will spend about a month letting my body adapt to shorter rest intervals.  Then I will move to the 1:05 threshold lane and do the same for the majority of my season.  Now to be honest, the first month in that lane sucks and I may barely make the interval but that’s exactly what you want to do.  Hold a pace and let your body adapt.  Hang with it, be consistent and it will pay off.

And pay off it does...the author exiting the water at 2013 IMAZ in a faster time than most of the pro field

Finally, like the other two sports, having good form and being efficient in the water is important and should not be sacrificed.  To this day, in every workout in every set on every repeat, I am thinking about reaching out and finishing through on my stroke. How I am breathing, rotating through the water, snapping my hips and how I am catching the water.  All the tips in the world are useless if your form is a mess.  So take the time to get instruction and watch good swimmers in the water.  Good luck and I hope you get fast!

The swim is just the start of what can be a very long day...make it as easy on yourself as possible!

Quick Tips for a Faster Bike Split

By Debbie
October 7, 2014 on 1:58 pm | In Uncategorized | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports athlete Billy Oliver. As a frequent podium topper, you might just want to read what he has to say. Check out Billy’s blog or follow him on Twitter – triathltb.

We all know the most important thing is the motor. But saving watts through smart gear choices is easy to do and will maximize the efficiency of your motor, allowing you to cover the same distance faster and begin your run fresher.

Let’s start with you. Your body is the biggest thing the wind sees. A proper aero position is vital to make yourself as little to the wind as possible. A proper fit is vital so that you can hold that position for the duration of the event. If you are not comfortable in your aero position, you will not stay in that position and will lose precious time.

Head position is vital to your aero position. Holding your head high puts it in the wind. Turtling your head to keep it low and out of the airflow will save time. Add to that an aero helmet and you’re talking major time savings. Not all aero helmets work for everyone. If you ride head down, a long tailed helmet will be sticking up in the wind and a blunt tailed helmet will be a faster match. Look at photos of yourself in races to see how you ride and make the best choice for you.

Billy Oliver super aero with his dialed in position and aero helmet

The new breed of aero triathlon frames will save you time over a round tube frame. Again though, a proper fitting frame is vital. The most aero frame in the world will not save you time if you can’t get into, and comfortably hold, a good aero position.

Aero wheels are another big time saver. As deep of a wheel as your handing skills allow in the front teamed up with a disc or deep aero wheel in the rear will yield big time gains, especially in longer distance races.

Save some serious time with aero wheels

The position of your water bottles is the next area of time savings. Wind tunnel testing has shown the most aero set up is a bottle horizontally mounted between your aerobars. If an additional bottle is needed, a bottle mounted as close to horizontal as possible behind your saddle is a good choice.

Carefully select your bottle set-up to maximize aerodynamics

Your clothing choice should be tight fitting. Loose clothing will flap in the wind. Don’t spend a lot investing in your bike and getting it as lightweight and aero as possible if you put on clothing that acts like a sail…it will undo all your efforts.

The little things will clean up airflow, also. Nutrition storage in a top tube mounted holder is superior to bars/gels taped all over the top tube. Nothing at all is even better…utilize the aid stations.

Top tube mounted bag for nutrition and other necessities

Cutting your cables to proper lengths and routing them cleanly will also yield small savings as they won’t be sticking out all over the place. Each of these is a small piece of the puzzle. Each will save you small amounts of time, and the more you employ, the bigger the time savings you will enjoy!

The Urban Triathlete

By Debbie
September 8, 2014 on 3:34 pm | In Community, Life at TriSports.com, Random Musings, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Anthony Bagnetto. Pay attention all you city-folk! Check out Anthony’s blog or follow him on Twitter – anthonybagnetto.

Being a triathlete is difficult.  Let’s face it, it’s a huge reason we all do it. ‘Easy’ bores us, only one discipline bores us (what, no transitions!?). Early mornings, inclement weather, technical and nutritional failures are all par for our course. But there is yet another subset of us who face an additional challenge in preparing for races which, time wise, is 95% of being a triathlete.

I’m speaking of us inner city dwellers. No, not the townhouse owners on the city’s edge with driveways and parking but us brave-hearted souls who dream of a second bedroom so we can not have bikes hanging precariously from the wall over our beds as we sleep. The barriers we face on top of the difficulties inherent in our endeavors require a lot of creativity and close intimacy with repetition.

The concrete jungle

I live in the heart of New York City, and happily, there is a strong, thriving triathlete community here with no fewer than 8 solid Tri teams, organizations, and countless cycling and running teams. The community is strong, the will is there–the space isn’t. We are up against each other every morning, runners darting out into cyclists, cyclists swerving into running paths. And, of course, the tens of thousands of tourists that descend, making going fast dangerous and nearly impossible.

This all happens on a 6 mile circle between the hours of 5-7:30am every weekday morning in our training ground, THE ONLY training ground, Central Park. OK, that’s not totally true. There are several spacious parks in the other boroughs, but if you’re centrally located, the commuting time might take longer than your workout time.

Central Park - triathlete training grounds

I’ve broken down challenges and clever ways we city-folk create to overcome them by discipline.

Swimming:

Being in the northeast and surrounded by concrete, the idea of an outdoor 8-lane Olympic sized pool is a pipe dream. Access to a 25 yard or a 25 or 50 meter pool is supremely hard, or at least very expensive, as they come with mandatory gyms fees attached (by my count, there are 3 Olympic lane swimming pools in Manhattan, none of them easy to reach). One way triathletes get around this is through those tri teams that we belong to. They often have relationships with different facilities, so if you are going to do mostly group workouts, you are allowed to use the pool with the group as part of your membership. Some private triathlon coaches, like myself, have these relationships, as well, and can get you in for private lessons.

Some are lucky/rich enough to have a pool in their doorman building, and I’ve had clients in a lot of them. While this sounds awesome, it really isn’t. I haven’t found one yet that’s actually 25 yards long. So being good at both math and flip turns is essential.

As for open water practice, you can head way out to one of the Brooklyn beaches and brave the waves but as for anywhere else, as they say there, “fuggedaboutit”

Biking:

Here in Manhattan there are 3 options, and only 2 of them really useful for any kind of speed work. The West Side Highway has a very nice bike/running path but therein lies the problem. Runners, walkers and aerobar’d speedster triathletes competing for space within 5 feet of each other isn’t ideal for anything other than slow recovery rides. Which leaves that 6 mile loop of Central Park I mentioned and that’s only useful during non-tourist hours before 8:30am. If you are a long course triathlete, it’s off to Jersey, along the well-ridden 9W route. While this option is great (wide shoulders, frequent cyclist-friendly coffee shops and bathrooms) it can become mind-numbingly repetitive. Plus, depending on where you live in NYC, the commute to get out over the George Washington bridge (read: warmup) can be over a half hour each way.

Want to really bike? Then get out of town!

There are a handful of growing indoor cycling studios with computrainers and flatscreens that welcome both teams and individuals for different workouts, and they become very popular in the winter offseason. Even these are cramped, though, and few have shower or changing facilities.

Running:

This is really where my city (or really any other city) shines for triathletes as it is much easier to lace up some shoes and be running just outside your door in only minutes. On foot there is no need to stick to the boring 6 mile drive in Central Park since you can veer onto any number of the hundreds of trails that crisscross the many iconic acres. Running with traffic can be challenging, but it’s a skill easily learned and, unless you are doing speed work, you can generally work the traffic lights so that there is minimal stopping. The people-watching is unrivaled and, with each neighborhood sometimes seeming like a separate country, boredom is never an issue.

Endless possibilities for run training

No matter which leg of a triathlon you are training for, in a city it’s difficult to escape the glass, steel and concrete bearing down on you every day. So when you are at those races in the country and you see a few of us looking up at the clear wide open sky in astonishment, just remember, this is our escape both figuratively and literally. We won’t let it slow us down, though, we just take it in faster.

Next Page »

Powered by WordPress. Based on Pool theme design by Borja Fernandez.
Entries and comments feeds. Valid XHTML and CSS. ^Top^